May 15

Month by Month School Green Team Ideas – July & August

Over the course of six weeks, we will share with you a whole year’s worth of ideas for your school’s Green Teams! Check back every week, and download a PDF of the entire 12-month plan at the end of the series!

If you missed the first installments of our Month-by-Month School Green Team Tasks, click here to start from the beginning. If you’ve read them, we hope that means you’ve organized your team, completed your building walk-throughs, and are ready for more! Keep reading for some suggested tasks for July and August.

For many school districts, July and August are times when there are not a lot of staff members around. Teachers and much of your school-year only staff have taken off for these two months. This doesn’t mean that school districts are completely deserted though! Many district staff are year round employees, and the empty buildings make for an ideal environment to make large-scale changes. Even if your Green Team is minimal during these summer months, there are big things that can be accomplished!

 

July: Focus on IT

Computers are one of the biggest energy users in any school district – there are probably several ID-10015475computers in each of your buildings. This means major opportunity for savings! Start by speaking with your IT manager about system-wide settings. Do all machines shut down automatically at night? Is there a standard time set for sleep mode? Do computers needs to be up and running to do updates? How many laptops vs desktops are in your building? If you don’t have an on staff IT manager, find out who runs your technology. It may be an outside company – if so, start with the contact person at your district that deals with this company. Consider these simple tips, and head to this blog post to learn more about saving energy and money via computers:

  • Shut down computers nightly. It’s a myth that shutting down computers too often can cause damage. Modern machines are meant to withstand 40,000 on/off cycles!
  • Monitors use the majority of energy consumed by desktop units – be sure staff and students are turning off monitors not just nightly, but anytime they are away from a computer.
  • Not convinced that shutting down computers can save you big bucks? Check out this example from a CLASS 5 school client (Computer-Costs-Calculations-Flier) showing just how fast it can add up!

 

August: Tackle plug load

Plug load is one of the biggest energy and money wasting culprits of all time. But what exactly is it? You may have also heard the terms “Vampire Energy” or “Standby Power”– these all refer to the same thing: energy (typically electricity) being drawn by items that are plugged in, but not in use. You may think that just because you’ve hit the off switch, that your electronics are not sucking any power from the outlet – but often times, that is not the case. Things such as projectors, SMARTboards, chargers, printers, coffee makers and microwaves all draw a constant stream of power, even when completely shut down. Take a look around a typical classroom in your district – how many items are plugged in right now? How many of those items are used every day? How many are directly related to teaching and learning? How many could be unplugged each night, or over weekends, when school buildings are closed? Consider lowering plug load by simply eliminating items that are not needed. Take this time to do a plug-load audit of your district. Record what type of items are plugged in and where. Note special teaching equipment, such as kilns or power tools. Make note of what is necessary, and what kind of personal additions you are finding. For example, you may find that there are several personal mini fridges in classrooms, individual space heaters or personal printers. Consider asking staff to either consolidate and share, or remove these items all together. Come up with a district-wide plan to provide community fridges, printers or other conveniences to serve your entire staff. A good rule of thumb when discovering plug-load culprits is to look for constant displays: Does your coffee maker have a clock, or your radio have an indicator light that tells you it’s off? If so – these items are contributing to plug load. Ask your district if there is a way to provide power-strips for each work space or classroom. By plugging multiple items into one strip, you can easily unplug many things all at once.

When school is back in session, have a communication written and ready to distribute about plug load. Make reducing plug load one of your main priorities for the next school year!

 

Miss a post? No problem – here’s the year’s plan so far:

Month by Month Green Team Tasks – January & February

Month by Month Green Team Tasks – March & April

Month by Month Green Team Tasks – May & June 

May 07

Does My School Need an Energy Efficiency Program?

SiouxTrailEnergyLeader

With all of the important initiatives facing K-12 schools today, we know that energy efficiency and sustainability is sometimes not a first priority. Schools know it’s important – and most people agree that saving energy is the right thing to do – but turning good intentions into actions is rarely easy unless there is a true need

Schools talk about including energy conservation in their overall goals, missions or plans, but rarely is a comprehensive energy efficiency program put in place. One common reason is the assumption that energy efficiency is the sole responsibility of the building operators. Another common reason is the fear of adding yet another thing to teachers’ plates. A third common reason is the lack of knowledge about putting a program together. Unfortunately, this means that thousands of school districts across the U.S. are missing out on a major cost-saving opportunity.

The majority of schools today are facing a budget crisis. Funding is being cut. Levees are more difficult to pass. Jobs are being cut. It’s difficult in every situation – and devastating to districts in some cases..

Here’s why you need an energy efficiency program:

According to ENERGY STAR®, the nation’s K-12 schools spend more on energy annually than on computers and textbooks combined. The EPA breaks down energy use in a typical building into several categories. The top 3 are lighting, cooling and office equipment. Depending on the part of the country you live in and the type of fuel you use, heating may also be a large expense.

An energy efficiency program provide strategies for reducing use and cost in these areas and more. And a behavior-based program addresses them without any capital investment.

By implementing a district-wide, people-based energy plan, your schools can start seeing a decrease in energy use and costs today. In fact, CLASS 5 K-12 clients see reductions of 8% on average in the first year alone. Districts that make the energy program a priority see even higher levels of savings.

Interested in learning more about why you school needs an energy program? Watch this video to hear how one district in Minnesota saved $2.6 million dollars in energy costs.

Start seeing your savings today.

May 01

Month by Month School Green Team Ideas – May & June

Over the course of six weeks, we will share with you a whole year’s worth of ideas for your school’s Green Teams! Check back every week, and download a PDF of the entire 12-month plan at the end of the series!

If you missed the first two installments of our Month-by-Month School Green Team Tasks, click here to start from the beginning. If you’ve read them, we hope that means you’ve organized your team, established a way to measure and report goals, and are ready for more! Keep reading for some suggested tasks for May and June.

 

May: District Wide Spring Clean

Set aside time this month to have each staff member clean their workspace, each teacher clean their classroom, and each student clean the common areas of a building. Take this chance to reorganize and choose more energy efficient options such as: plugging into power strips; consolidating small appliances and recycling or selling extra things your school no longer needs; ensure all shades are in working order; clean the coils on refrigerators and the fans on computers, copiers and printers; replace air filters and check for leaky faucets or toilets.

Get the students involved as well! Staff can help oversee as elementary students clean their classrooms and older students help out in places like the gym, cafeteria or auditorium.

 

June: Do building walk-throughs and meet with facility operators

Does your Green Team know what type of heating and cooling systems are in your school buildings? How about what your thermostat set points are? Do you have T8 or T12 lights in your ballasts? These are all great questions to ask your facility operators! Set up a meeting with the lead engineer for year district, or at each school, to discuss which operational strategies can be implemented in your iStock_000011083906Smallbuildings to cut energy use and costs. Don’t have a building operator? Find out who runs your building – whether it’s a volunteer, a custodial service, someone in a leadership position or an outside contractor – and go over these Top-15-Strategies-to-Jump-Start-Your-Facilities

Once you’ve established how your buildings run, you can come up with some great strategies for how to run them even more efficiently during the next school year! Work with your building operators to come up with a plan. By allowing them the entire summer to make the changes necessary, you can help ensure that things are in place before the buildings are fully occupied again.

 

Miss a post? No problem – here’s the year’s plan so far:

Month by Month Green Team Tasks – January & February

Month by Month Green Team Tasks – March & April

Apr 27

10 Facts About Why Energy Efficiency is Good for Your School District

 

Depositphotos_18396911_originalIf you are thinking about an energy conservation program for your school district, you are probably wondering how much of an impact it could make. What kind of money can be saved? How much will you actually be helping the environment? Can an energy efficiency program affect staff or student performance?

Here are 10 facts about why energy efficiency is good for your school district:

  1. U.S. schools spend more than $6 billion a year on energy. Most schools could save 25% of these costs by being smarter about energy. Energy improvements have the potential to save our nation’s schools $1.5 billion each year (U.S. Dept of Energy, 2002).
  2. Improving energy efficiency in school buildings will help reduce GHG emissions and air pollutants by decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. Fossil fuel consumption from electricity accounts for 40% of the nation’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a principal GHG, and 67% and 23% of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, respectively, which can lead to smog, acid rain and respiratory problems for many people (U.S. EPA, 20081; U.S. EPA, 2008m).
  3. The increase in computer labs and personal computers in schools has added a significant load to school energy budgets. When turned off over a 7-day break rather than being left in “active on” mode, one desktop computer and monitor would save $2.70 on average in one week. While this may seem inconsequential, multiply that by 100 computers in a school, or 1,000 computers in a district and the savings add up quickly. Institute a policy to turn off monitors when not in use to extend savings throughout the year (KY Energy and Environment Cabinet, 2011).
  4. Investing in energy efficiency can stimulate the local economy and encourage development of energy efficiency service markets. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), approximately 60% of energy efficiency investments goes to labor costs, and half of all energy-efficient equipment is purchased from local supplies (U.S. DOE, 2004). Across the nation, energy efficiency technologies and services are estimated to have created more than 8 million jobs in 2006 (ASES, 2008).
  5. Schools spend approximate $75 per student on gas and $130 per student on electricity each year (U.S. EPA, 2008). By implementing energy efficiency measures, many K-12 schools have been able to reduce energy costs by as much as 30% in excising facilities (U.S. EPA, 2004b). According to the EPA, modification of a pre-existing building for energy efficiency can save a typical 100,000 square-foot school building between $10,000 and $16,000 annually, and simple behavioral and operational measures alone can reduce energy costs by up to 25% (U.S. EPA, 2008).
  6. (2005 Buildings Energy Data Book). Using a technique such as delamping will reduce unnecessary lighting as well as cut significant costs each month.
  7. (2005 Buildings Energy Data Book). For every 1° you adjust your thermostat, you can reduce energy use and costs by 1%. Reducing temperature set points for just 8 hours per day will yield you these savings. (U.S. Department of Energy, 2012).
  8. Energy-efficient school building designs often use natural daylight to reduce the energy needed to light a building. Natural light has been proven to have a positive effect on student performance. According to a study for the California Board for Energy Efficiency, students exposed to natural daylight in classrooms progress as much as 20% faster on math tests and as much as 26% faster on reading tests than students with no daylight exposure (HMG, 1999). Another study concluded that students in schools that offer environmental education programs have higher test scores than students in schools with no such programs (U.S. EPA, 2008).
  9. Some energy efficiency upgrades can improve occupant health by enhancing indoor air quality. Installing energy recovery ventilation equipment, for example, can reduce infiltration of air contaminants from outdoors while significantly reducing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning energy loads (U.S. EPA, 2003). One study on building performance found that average reduction in illness as a result of improved air quality in buildings is about 40% (Carnegie Mellon, 2005).
  10. For every 1,000 kwh you are able to shave from your energy consumption, you are reducing CO2 emissions equivalent to 79 gallons of gasoline, 29 propane cylinders or carbon sequestered by 18 saplings. Each 1,000 therms of natural gas you reduce avoids GHG emissions equivalent to 2 tons of waste in the landfill or CO2 emissions from 12 barrels of oil (U.S. EPA, 2013).

Apr 15

Month by Month School Green Team Ideas – March & April

Over the course of six weeks, we will share with you a whole year’s worth of ideas for your school’s Green Teams! Check back every week, and download a PDF of the entire 12-month plan at the end of the series!

If you missed our first installment of Month-by-Month Green Team Tasks, click here to read it. If you read the first one, we hope that means you’ve already started your 12-month calendar, organized your school’s Green Team and are ready for more! Keep reading for some suggested tasks for March and April.

 

March: Establish a System for Measuring and Reporting Results

How many times has your team wondered about or been asked these questions:

  • How much energy does our school district use? Is that more or less than we should be using?
  • How does our energy use compare to other schools just like us?
  • How much money do we spend on energy?
  • How much money have we saved since we starting working to be more green?

 

At CLASS 5 Energy, we stress to our clients that measuring and sharing energy use and costs is one of the most important aspects of a district wide energy-saving effort. That’s because it’s very hard to manage something you don’t measure. Think of it like losing weight – after a few weeks of dieting, your clothes might fit better and you may have more energy, but will you really know if you’ve reached your goal if you never step on a scale? Whether you are using a certified measurement and verification tool, such as the one developed by CLASS 5 Energy, or simply a checklist to mark when goals have been completed – now is the time to start thinking about how to communicate where you are starting and what you are hoping to achieve.

Most school districts track their energy use and costs monthly, in conjunction with receiving their utility measure-energy-savingsbills. In order to share this information, we recommend reporting results quarterly. This gives enough time to see trends and patterns, but doesn’t allow for too much time to pass and people to forget that you are working towards these goals. Work with your communications team to decide how and when results will be announced.

As a school district, it’s important to share this information with your staff as well as the community! Saving money through saving energy is a great way to show that you are being responsible with tax dollars and value the property and buildings within your district.

 

April: Earth Day – Plan an Event

There are many ways to celebrate Earth Day – cleaning up trash, planting trees, donating to an environmental cause or simply raising awareness around your building are all great places to start. If you are looking for ideas, visit the Earth Day website to pledge an act of green.

Not sure what to do in your district? Here are 2 ideas:

  • Have an energy-free staff potluck to raise awareness about conserving energy. Ask everyone to bring a dish that requires no energy (heating or cooling) to make or store: salsas, crackers, hard cheeses, fresh fruits and veggies or these no-cook desserts and other recipes
  • Hold a district-wide campus clean up! Get staff, students and even the community to come and clean up your buildings and grounds. Since everyone in the district will be out cleaning, it’s a great time to save some energy as well! Shut down computers, turn out lights, shut off office equipment and unplug any electronics that won’t be used for teaching or learning during the campus clean up.

Community building events such as these tend to pay dividends far greater than the resources they require: in staff, student and community satisfaction, stronger team development and increased morale. And all the while you are doing your part to make the world more sustainable.

Miss a post? No problem – here’s the first post:

Month-by-Month Green Team Tasks – January & February

Apr 09

8 Reasons Your School Should be More Energy Efficient

8-reasons-your-school-should-be-more-energy-efficientAt CLASS 5 Energy, one of our most popular products is the Schools for Energy Efficiency (SEE) Program®. For over 10 years, we have been helping K-12 schools across the United States reduce their energy consumption and save money along the way. We’ve worked with school districts of all sizes, and help them avoid millions of dollars of energy costs – not to mention reduced GHG emissions and shrinking the footprint of more than 800 buildings.

There are many reasons for K-12 schools to reduce energy. ENERGY STAR®, who we work closely with, lays out these reasons why your schools should be more energy efficient:

  • Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and other environmental impacts. Improving energy efficiency in schools buildings can help reduce GHG emissions and air pollutants by decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. Fossil fuel consumption from electricity accounts for 40% of the nations carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a principal GHG, and 67% and 23% of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, respectively, which can lead to smog, acid rain and respiratory problems for many people (U.S. EPA, 20081; U.S. EPA, 2008m).
  • Increase economic benefits through job creation and market development. Investing in energy efficiency can stimulate the local economy and encourage development of energy efficiency service markets. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), approximately 60% of energy efficiency investments goes to labor costs, and half of all energy-efficient equipment is purchased from local supplies (U.S. DOE, 2004). Across the nation, energy efficiency technologies and services are estimated to have created more than 8 million jobs in 2006 (ASES, 2008).
  • Demonstrate leadership. Investing in energy efficiency helps raise demand of energy-efficient technology from local residents and business, and demonstrates responsible stewardship of public resources since reduced energy costs translate into save tax dollars. (U.S. DOE, 2007).
  • Reduce energy costs. Schools spend approximate $75 per student on gas bills and $130 per student on electricity each year (U.S. EPA, 2008). By implement energy efficiency measures, many K-12 schools have been able to reduce energy costs by as much as 30% in excising facilities (U.S. EPA, 2004b). According to the EPA, modification of a pre-existing building for energy efficiency can save a typical 100,000 square foot school building between $10,000 and $16,000 annually, and simple behavioral and operational measures alone can reduce energy costs by up to 25% (U.S. EPA, 2008).
  • Improve student performance. Energy-efficiency school building designs often use natural daylight to reduce the nervy needed to light a building. Natural light has been proven to have a positive effect on student performance. According to a study for the California Board for Energy Efficiency, students exposed to natural daylight in classrooms progress as much as 20% faster ton math tests and as much as 26% faster on reading tests than students with no daylight exposure (HMG, 1999). Another study concluded that students in schools that offer environmental education programs have higher test scores than students in schools with no such programs (U.S. EPA, 2008).
  • Improve indoor air quality. Some energy efficiency upgrades can improve occupant health by enhancing indoor air quality. Installing energy recovery ventilation equipment, for example, can reduce infiltration of air contaminants from outdoors while significantly reducing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) energy loads (U.S. EPA, 2003). One study on building performance found that average reduction in illness as a result of improved air quality in buildings is about 40% (Carnegie Mellon, 2005).
  • Increase security and safety. Improving energy efficiency in K-12 school buildings can have positive effects on school security and student safety. For example, energy-efficient exterior lighting can enhance security while reducing energy costs by providing effective and even light distribution (U.S. EPA, 2008).
  • Other benefits. Other benefits from improving energy efficiency in K-12 school buildings include improvements in teacher retention rates, reductions in insurance costs, and reduced legal liability due to improved indoor environmental quality (Capital E, 2006; CHPS, 2006).

Apr 01

Month by Month School Green Team Ideas – January & February

Over the course of six weeks, we will share with you a whole year’s worth of ideas for your school’s Green Team! Check back every week, and download a PDF of the entire 12-month plan at the end of the series!

If your school district has adopted sustainability and energy efficiency as one of its core values, you have probably started a Green Team. Perhaps there is just one team to represent the entire district – or, maybe you have a team at each school.

No matter what your team look like, one of the most common questions we are asked is “What should my Green Team be doing?” This is a common problem among school districts – they form a Green Team to oversee and coordinate sustainability efforts and at first, things are going great! But after a while, the ideas don’t come so easily, team members get engaged with other activities, and the committee starts to break down. Or, maybe team members are still diligently showing up for each meeting but you (or they) feel discouraged about how to best focus their interest and efforts. Summer poses a challenge because many school staff are off, so efforts tend to fall to the wayside.

Let us help solve these problems with this School Green Team plan!

 

One good place to begin is by creating an annual calendar. Give each month a single theme or event to give your meetings focus, and your Team a purpose. For a list of possible focus areas, click here to see a calendar of energy-related holidays.

Next, be sure that each member of the Green Team is assigned specific tasks and deadlines by which to complete those tasks. Examples might include:

  • Developing a reward and recognition program for buildings, teams, staff or students that demonstrate outstanding energy efficiency efforts
  • Reviewing and customizing energy-related employee or student communications – including emails, newsletters, posters, stickers or electronic signage
  • Reviewing IT technologies and exploring what IT-related energy strategies your school district should consider
  • Authoring articles for posting on the school blog or website, or for putting in school newsletters.

Another approach is to split your Green Team up into subcommittees. Consider these four categories as focus areas for your team.

  • Event planning and Recognition
  • Communications
  • Measurement and Verification (M&V)
  • Operations and Facilities

Be sure to keep your group meeting regularly, especially as you establish these new roles. Make time at each meeting for team members to “report out” to the rest of the group about their ideas and initiatives.

 

January: Create a communications calendar

Communications are a core part of any good sustainability plan. As the Green Team, it is your job to ensure that the people in your school district – and in your community – are informed, educated and aware of your energy conservation efforts, goals and achievements. Consider the following:

  • What types of communications will you send this year?

o   Newsletters, email blasts, student newspaper, community press releases, internal communications, quick tips via pay stubs, the intranet, Twitter, etc.

o   Who will write them?

o   Who will send them/how will they be distributed?

  • Choose a start date – when will the first communication go out?
  • Set the dates for each communication to go out through the end of the calendar year
  • Brainstorm topics, tips or ideas. Be sure to have one idea per date you have put on the calendar. So, if you are doing monthly newsletters – be sure to have 12 topics.
  • Don’t forget about sharing your results! We recommend providing progress updates at least quarterly.
  • Be sure you are communicating with staff, students and the community!

 

 

Annual-Environmental-Calendar-1024x791

 

 

February: Start a recycling program

If you don’t already have a recycling program in your school district – start one! Begin by touching base with your building operations or health and safety department. These folks may already have some ideas! Many communities and trash haulers offer resources to help you get started. Begin by finding out whether or not recycling is picked up by your waste management service. If it is, ask if your pick up is single sort or multiple sort. You might be surprised to find out that it doesn’t cost more to recycle, since you end up reducing the volume of trash that goes into the garbage. If recycling isn’t picked up by your hauler, set up an in-house recycling program by asking for a volunteer each week to empty recycling bins and properly dispose of the waste. A staff member and/or student group could be in charge of this at each building! Some communities have recycling centers that will pay you for your aluminum or glass – perhaps this small monetary reward could be kept by the group or school building each week!

Already have a recycling program? Use this month to raise awareness about it and be sure everyone in your district is recycling. Or – take it a step further and start composting or recycling organic materials. Many of the schools we work with have partnerships with local farmers, where their food waste is repurposed as animal feed. Some trash haulers will have compost bins and will even pick up your organic waste for you!

 

Check back next week to find out what your school’s Green Team can focus on for March and April!

 

 

Mar 26

Top 5 Low and No Cost Tips to Reduce Your School Pool’s Energy Use

Swimming pools are common in schools. They are also a major consumer of energy – one that often goes overlooked when thinking about how to reduce energy use.

Pools can be expensive to maintain, and there are many choices when it comes to the type of cleaning, heating and general care that are available. If your school district houses a pool, be sure you are getting the most bang for your buck by utilizing these low and no cost energy-saving tips, from CLASS 5 Energy:

  1. Cover pools when not in use to reduce water and chemical loss due to normal evaporation
  2. Repair swimming pool leaks right away – even small leaks can waste thousands of gallons of water per year
  3. Reduce pool water temperature by 2°. The cooler the water, the less evaporation will occur
  4. Shut down fountains and waterfalls whenever pool is closed
  5. Install control devices such as Vending Misers or other timers.

These simple low and no cost changes can make a big difference in the cost of maintaining your pool. When it comes to reducing energy and saving money – each piece of your building can contribute!

Mar 12

4 Low and No Cost Energy Saving Techniques for School Districts

4-low-no-cost-energy-saving-techniques-for-school-districts

Low and no cost energy saving techniques don’t just involve turning off lights and changing the thermostat – communication and engagement are also key components is getting people in your school district to save energy! Instead of just send an email or making an announcement, why not consider having a building or district wide event in order to raise awareness?

If you are looking to breathe some new life into energy efficiency efforts, here are 4 techniques to kick off low and not cost energy savings in your school district!

  1. Plan an organization-wide, energy-focused event. When we plan kick-off events, we like to include something fun and interactive. Hands-on activities such as a human power generator help bring energy to life. Other things you can do include: creating a trivia game about how energy is used in your facilities; asking people for comments, suggestions or ideas related to energy – and giving anyone who contributes a small token of thanks; or holding an awards ceremony to recognize people in your organization who have contributed to the energy saving effort.
  2. Host an energy-free breakfast or lunch. Nothing brings a group of people together, or gets them more interested in a topic, than free food! Walk the walk by hosting a green, energy-free and waste-free event. Serve foods that don’t require any energy to prep or serve, such as no-bake desserts, raw salads, no-cook foods and snacks like crackers, nuts and dried fruits. Be sure to serve everything on reusable tableware – no disposable paper or plastic plates, forks and cups! Make pitchers of lemonade or sun tea, and don’t just provide trash cans – provide recycling and compost containers as well!
  3. Hold a “Lunch-n-Learn.” This type of event can take your energy-free meal to the next level by also providing a structured lesson or lecture. Invite folks to grab a plate of food and then sit down to learn about an energy-related topic. Some fun ideas might include: “How to Save Energy at Your Desk” or “How to Read Your Utility Bill.”.
  4. Plan an Energy Fair. This is an especially great idea for K-12 schools or colleges. Classrooms, students or staff choose an energy-related topic and create informational posters and projects to bring the topic to life. Encourage people to show what they’ve done already to conserve energy, as well as to explore creative new ideas to save energy in the future. Invite the community into your school to visit and learn all about your efforts.

Mar 02

School Shut Down Tips for Saving Energy Over Winter, Spring or Summer Break

Most schools shut down for an extended period for winter, spring and summer breaks. When your buildings are unoccupied for a week or longer, this is a great time to bank some major savings on energy use! Making some small adjustments to your operations, and being sure that classrooms and offices are buttoned up tight will ensure that you aren’t wasting dollars on empty buildings.

Here are some things you should be sure are done before the last staff member leaves for break…for a full shut down checklist, print this PDF: SEE_Shutdown_Checklist

 

  • Set back building temperatures to 50°
  • Be sure all lights are off district wide
  • Completely shut down all electronics district wide
  • Consolidate refrigerators and unplugged empty ones
  • Unplug any large appliances that will not be affected over the break (vending machines, ovens, coffee makers, printers, microwaves)
  • Turn off (or down) water heaters and pumps
  • Be sure all windows, blinds and shades are shut

 

Everyone can do their part to be sure that your buildings are secure, safe and saving energy over the long break. Ask everyone to do a final check of their space before they leave, and include the shut down checklist on your building operations “closing procedures”.

 

Enjoy your break!

 

ID-10056323

 

 

 

 

image courtesy of http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/

Older posts «

Follow
Get FREE articles sent to you that will help you save energy, money and the planet.    
Join millions of other followers
Powered By WPFruits.com